Continuing the Journey

In my last post, I spoke briefly of a new service. A questionnaire to gauge your story. Let me go deeper into the reasons an author needs this service.

I’m sure my comment that the questionnaire focuses on plot, characters, genre, etc. had authors thinking, well that is what an edit does, so this is just a ploy for the editor to charge extra money.

Some editors, but not me. This service is not an edit. I read the manuscript from beginning to end from the perspective of reader, a buyer of books. Throughout the process I will always think, is this a story I would purchase. Let that idea sink in a moment. All authors believe their stories are worth purchasing. But, we’re not looking at them from the reader’s side. If the story doesn’t capture the attention of the reader, hold it throughout the book, then it does not matter what we think.

Again, I’m sure authors are thinking, “That’s what my editor is for.” It is if you have deep pockets. Developmental editing costly. And, when an editor comes back and says, “I require $900 for a single edit and the story is going to need to be completely rewritten.” The author will be shell-shocked.

I may have exaggerated a bit on the price, but not by more than $100. I’ve been asked to fork over nearly as much and the feedback was not as drastic, the story did not require plot or character revision.

My point? Not only is the service necessary, more importantly, it’s cost effective to the writer. My questionnaire gives detailed responses to questions, showing the author just how receptive a reader is to your story. If a reader isn’t fond of it, then neither will a publishing house. It then allows the writer to go back and rework weak areas in the manuscript.

The result, they can send the story to a publisher with confidence. The best part, it is more likely to be accepted for publication and, in many cases, it will shorten the time of editing, thus the book will be published sooner.

Consider adding this step to your editing process. Check out my services page. I look forward to working with you.

Where the Journey Begins

The journey of a writer begins with the idea of a story. It can, seemingly, come out of nowhere. A drive past a forest. A budding group of singers standing on the sidewalk entertaining a crowd hoping to draw the attention of a producer. It can be the kindness toward a child or even discrimination hatred that prompts a person to write a story.

At other times, the story simmers for years in the back of the writer’s mind. Waiting for the opportune moment to give a push, finally becoming the story it was meant to be.

Just like the journey of  a writer, the editor plays a vital role as well. It’s a task both author and editor should give great consideration to.

The editor’s job is to shape the story. To ask the writer to pull out extraneous information or add details where necessary; all the while keeping the tone of the writer’s voice.

Every edit is different. It’s shaped by the writer, the characters, the genre of the story. But in the same token, characters, genre, plot, etc. remain constant no matter who the author is. Thus, I have added a new editing service. It is not a new idea with me. I’ve worked with similar questionnaires in the past.

And this new service is a great tool for authors to gauge exactly where their story needs work. The assessment focuses on characters, plot, the elements of the genre, use of passive or active words. Ir shows the author’s strengths and weaknesses in their manuscript.

I hope you take the time to review my services. But, also, feel free to contact me with any question or concern you might have. And know, you’re story is in experienced hands when choosing MCFE.

Thanks for joining me!

Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter. — Izaak Walton

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